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173. Alexander Spence – Oar

173. Alexander Spence – Oar

Brian Wilson, Syd Barrett, Sinead O’ Connor, Ian Curtis, Kurt Cobain… there’s always been a parallel between rock music and mental illness, just as there has been with pretty much any art form worth bothering with. To say that Alexander ‘Skip’ Spence is no...
172. The Stooges – The Stooges

172. The Stooges – The Stooges

About fucking time. There’s only two albums from the sixties left in this list, but for me it’s been a long time since I kicked it off with Joan Baez, and for all the top tuneage there’s been, my Generation X loins have been aching for something a bit more… well… … a...
171. Scott Walker – Scott 4

171. Scott Walker – Scott 4

There’s something very cerebral and earnest about Scott Walker – whether it’s his haunting voice or his famed introspection and reclusiveness, there’s something about his work that makes you feel like you’re part of a cultured few discovering his music. Of course,...
170. Fairport Convention – Liege and Lief

170. Fairport Convention – Liege and Lief

Oh dear, more folk… Right then let’s get this over with. Belts off, trousers down… bite the pillow… … Oh, actually it’s not bad. “Liege and Lief” is often talked about as the album that defined, even created the British folk-rock genre. It came hard on the heels of...
169. Leonard Cohen – Songs from a Room

169. Leonard Cohen – Songs from a Room

For me at least, one of the big paradoxes of Leonard Cohen is that, for all the outward melancholy, there’s something uniquely uplifting about his songs. Whether it’s “Sisters of Mercy”, “Suzanne” or the later and stranger “First we Take Manhattan”, every one of them...